Salt Creek Beach Campground is a large primitive tent and RV campground on the banks of the Salton Sea and offers waterfront camping with access to many activities. The area around the Salton Sea is popular for water activities as well as off-road driving, with plenty of wide-open spaces and jagged hills nearby. There are also several trails leading out of Salt Creek Beach Campground to popular destinations like the nearby Bat Cave Buttes, which is a series of caves that is, a popular recreation site in Southern California.

Salt Creek Beach Campground has 200 primitive campsites that are accessible by tent and RV campers. While the campsites are labeled as primitive campsites, drinking water and port-a-potties are available for campers. Campfires are allowed in self-provided metal containers only. Reservations are not accepted.

Salt Creek Beach Campground Features

Campground Type: Organized, Primitive
Number of Campsites: 200 Campsites
Cost: $10/night
Use Level: Low – Medium
Dogs Allowed: Yes
Fire Rings: None – Camp fires allowed, campers must provide fire rings
Drinking Water: Yes
Toilets: Yes – Port-a-Potties
Showers: None
Trash/Dumpsters: Yes
Hiking Access: Yes
Beach/Lake Access: Yes
RV/Trailer Length: Unlimited
RV/Trailer Amenities: Dump Station available at Headquarters Campground
Cell Phone Service: Possible on some carriers
Wifi: None
Operating Season: Campground Open Year-round
Other:

Getting There

Address:
Geo Coordinates: 33.444080, -115.845852
Nearest City/Town: Indio, California
Elevation: 50 Feet Below Sea Level
Location: Riverside County, California
Paved Road Access: Yes
Proximity to Stores: 10 Miles to Mecca, California.
Directions:
  • From Los Angeles: Head east on Interstate 10 to Indio, take 86S exit then turn left at Avenue 66, then right onto Highway 111.  Go south about 12 miles to the Salton Sea SRA Headquarters entrance.
  • From San Diego: take Highway 78 east, then left (north) on Highway 86 .  Turn right at Avenue 66 and then right onto Highway 111.  Go south about 12 miles to the Salton Sea SRA Headquarters entrance.

Connect

Phone: (760) 393-3052 Facebook:
Web: California State Parks Twitter:
Reservations: Not Available

When To Go

Fall through Spring – Summer is very hot in the Salton Sea State Recreation Area, and camping is not ideal with temperatures over 110-degrees. Winter, fall, and spring offer more hospitable temperatures and offer access to the more remote parts in the area for off-roading and hiking.

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What To Do

Swimming, Boating, & Kayaking – The area around Salt Creek Beach Campground offers access to the shrinking Salton Sea for water activities.

Off-Roading – There are hundreds of miles of off-road trails surrounding theSalt Creek Beach Campground and the Salton Sea.

Fun Facts

The Salton Sea is the largest lake in the state of California. The lake as it currently is, was created by accident in 1905 after floods broke through a levy near Yuma, Arizona to fill the ancient extension of the Gulf of California. After the flood, the Salton Sea became a permanent fixture in the desert, attracting water foul and other animals. The lake is somewhat unique in that it has no outlets and only inlets from rivers. This contributes, along with nearby agricultural runoff to increasing salinity in the water, which is no 40% saltier than sea water and is killing off freshwater fish in the lake. Also, the Salton Sea is under threat from evaporation which is depleting the water from the lake faster than it can be replenished under current drought conditions.

 Image Credits:  Robot Brainz via Flickr

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Justin is an IT Professional, focused on cloud, mobile, and infrastructure management and security with his consulting business, as well as chief bottle washer for this website. In addition to NextCampsite.com, Justin also runs and writes for the technology infrastructure-focused blog OddJobsInTech.com, and the mobile device-focused blog EnterpriseMobileDevice.com.

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